An Exciting New Collaboration in Coventry!

In March the exhibition Degas’ Dancers: A Courtauld Masterpiece opened at the Herbert Art Gallery and Museum. It included one of The Courtauld’s most famous pieces of work Degas’ Two Dancers on a Stage, 1874, as well as two sculptures and a drawing.

 

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Edgar Degas, Two Dancers on a Stage, 1874, The Courtauld Gallery, London

To celebrate these works on tour in Coventry the learning departments from both the Herbert and The Courtauld have worked together to put on a range of events for the public. For example, the Herbert organised a number of late openings to engage new audiences and The Courtauld’s Oak Foundation Young People’s Programme Coordinator (Thurs-Fri) Helen Higgins delivered a number of talks as part of this. We also took the time to observe and learn from each other’s specialisms, which you can read below.

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Meghan Goodeve, Oak Foundation Young People’s Programme Coordinator (Mon-Weds) from The Courtauld, reflects on primary school workshops ran by The Herbert:

“One of the first things that struck me when meeting the learning team from the Herbert was how comprehensive their primary school programme was. I was keen to observe one of these and see how they used their amazing learning space. I was lucky enough to see a workshop on the theme of sculpture (including our Degas!) for 28 year 4 students from local Gosford Park Primary School. The session was engaging and lively, using props such as a chisel and hammer (under close supervision!!) to demonstrate key ways of making sculpture, in this case carving. The Herbert were also brilliant at grounding the learning in literacy, using sheets with key words to help expand the students’ vocabulary. One of my favourite bits of the workshop was when a student was asked to play the role of the workshop teacher and lead the class through their own visual analysis of a work – culminating their learning from earlier in the session. Finally, we hit their learning space to take part in some hands-on clay sculpture. I know the table I was on really enjoyed this and left clutching their work proudly!”

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Brian Scholes, Learning Officer for Schools from the Herbert, reflects on a post-16 outreach workshop for Coventry City College delivered by The Courtauld:

“The outreach workshop was delivered to a group of 20 art students from different disciplines including painting, photography and graphic design. Meghan Goodeve and Naomi Lebens from The Courtauld led the session, beginning with a presentation in the Herbert’s learning space which gave a brief history of the Courtauld. This was extremely illuminating as it also gave the students a chance to learn about the nature and the status of modern art at the end of the 19th and turn of the 20th centuries.

Meghan then introduced the students to the role of curators in museums. This included an exploration of the different viewpoints of art historians and how this can influence the interpretation of an artwork (The Courtauld’s masterpiece A Bar at the Folies Bergere was used as an illustration for critique). A discussion then took place around how differing interpretations of artworks can influence the creation of an exhibition. Bearing these points in mind the students were then introduced the Herbert’s exhibition Degas’ Dancers in the gallery. The students engaged in an interesting discussion about the content and display.

After lunch the students were given a task, working in small groups, in the learning space. This was led by Meghan and Naomi. Each group was given a series of postcards of paintings from The Courtauld collection. The groups had to pick a theme, then choose appropriate works of art (using the postcards) in order to design an (imaginary) exhibition, including the physical layout of the show. This led to much discussion as ideas flowed and eventually each group came up with a design for an exhibition using the learning from the day.

The whole experience was invaluable to the students, not least because they were all about to embark on the display of their end-of-year shows.”

 

 

We Welcome Welling School Back

We are happy to announce that this year we are working with Welling School and their brilliant year 7 students again. Yesterday we welcomed the first group of their students to The Courtauld Gallery to explore our current display Bridget Riley: Learning from Seurat. They spent the day with art historian Dr Katie Faulkner and artist Nadine Mahoney thinking about how artists use paintings from the past to learn, Seurat’s and Riley’s use of colour theory, and the difference between copying and transcriptions. My favourite quote from the day is ‘I learnt that you can learn a lot about painting yourself by observing other people’s paintings’. We are now all equip to visit any gallery and learn like an artist! Here are some photos from the day…

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We can’t wait for our visit to Welling School in December…

Meghan Goodeve, Oak Foundation Young People’s Programme Coordinator (job-share with Helen Higgins)

 

Working with Welling

The Courtauld Institute of Art and Welling School are happy to present to you our zines. These are the result of a collaboration that has taken place over the 2014-15 academic year, where 150 pupils in year 7 at Welling School visited The Courtauld Gallery and have taken part in art and art history workshops. From Medieval saints to Paul Gauguin’s radical nudes, the students have explored the collection working with artists, academics, and designers. Ten students were selected from their peers to make these zines, investigating the theme of gender in The Courtauld Gallery. Ultimately, this project is a celebration of the ways in which art history and art practice can complement and enrich each other.

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This project was in response to Welling School’s exciting curriculum model of the ‘canon’. Lessons offer a way to teach history through the lens of history of art for year 7 students. To extend and enrich this curriculum, students were taken on trips to The Courtauld Gallery focusing on different elements of the collection and working with a new academic, educator, or artist each time. For example, the first visit in November 2014 looked at Jasper Johns and symbolism.

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These trips to the gallery were complemented by afterschool seminars and workshops, where students were handpicked to attend due to an interest in art history. Themes of these included: 19th century art, modern British sculpture, and wood cut prints.

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Following the success of this model in the Autumn and Spring terms, we decided to stretch a small group of students and challenge them to create a zine (or fanzine) stemming from the theme of The Courtauld’s exhibition Goya: The Witches and Old Women Album. To create these, they thought critically about gender in response to The Courtauld’s collection, learning how to research in a gallery and art library. Moreover, they reflected on the development of feminist art history reading original texts by seminal feminist art historians such as Griselda Pollock and Linda Nochlin. Finally, they learnt about the activist history of zine-making, experimented with this form of communication, and to quote one of the students, ‘learnt that zines really help to get your message out to the world’.

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Over one visit to the gallery, two afterschool workshops, two full-day workshops, and just one day to print at The Common House, the students produced a series of five professional zines that relate to notion of Gender and The Courtauld. Taking just two pieces of artwork from The Courtauld’s collection they constructed critical arguments on themes such as Trapped and Free, Blue Sky Dark Purpose, Working Girls, Judging Feminism: Motherhood, and Women as Objects. And here they are!

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poster 4 text 4

 

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And to close, I would like to leave you with this comment from one of the Welling School teachers involved: ‘The project became an opportunity for the students to intervene in their own learning through probing the very subject they study, and steering their own path as critical thinkers. Through working together with academics from The Courtauld Institute they have made a real engagement in theory and principles of art history.’

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(An exhibition at Welling School, which included work from this project)

To find out more, or if you are interested in running an extended project in your school, contact Meghan Goodeve on education@courtauld.ac.uk or 0207 848 1058.

click, connect, construct!

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The 16-19 student visual essay competition is open to all young people aged 16-19 years who are studying or interested in art, art history and the humanities subjects.

Developed in partnership with FE and sixth form tutors, this digital project is centred on twentieth-century art historian Aby Warburg and utilises Pinterest.  Pinterest is a great way to collect images digitally and to shift through the multitude of artworks that are available on the internet. We are asking students to create a visual essay based on and around an artwork from The Courtauld Gallery collection.

The project brief supports students in developing visual literacy, research skills, knowledge and confidence for the critical and contextual component of the Art and Design A-level, BTEC and for the EPQ.

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HOW TO ENTER:

The Competition opens on the 29th September 2014.  The deadline for submissions is the 12th December 2014.

Details on how to submit student work digitally are covered in the brief.

Our Information for Teachers guide contains detaild of CPD opportunities and workshops that we offer to support you in delivering this project.

Find out more:

 

Check out The Courtauld’s Education Pinterest http://www.pinterest.com/ecourtauld/and how the project was developed here.