Views and Reviews


Jenny Saville (Gagosian Gallery)

Monday, 14 July, 2014 by Lisa Moravec

Jenny Saville, Odalisque, 2012–14, 
Oil and charcoal on canvas
, 217 x 236.5 cm © Jenny Saville, 

Photo by Mike Bruce

Jenny Saville, Odalisque, 2012–14, 
Oil and charcoal on canvas
, 217 x 236.5 cm © Jenny Saville, 

Photo by Mike Bruce

The latest large-scale works by the British painter Jenny Saville (*1970) are for everyone who makes a fetish of delicate fingers and toes.  The strong, but at the same time tender, black outlines of bodily endings and coloured heaps of flesh reveal much about the different stages of human embrace.

In 2012, Jenny Saville said in an interview with the Guardian that the older you get, the more doubtful you become – in a good way. Back then she compared being an artist to being an athlete. “You get quite fit on your toes when you’re really pushing. But then you finish a piece, and you have to start all over again.”

Jenny Saville, 
In the realm of the Mothers I, 2012–14, 
Charcoal on canvas
, 249.8 x 332.2 x 5 cm © Jenny Saville, 

Photo by Mike Bruce

Jenny Saville, 
In the realm of the Mothers I, 2012–14, 
Charcoal on canvas
, 249.8 x 332.2 x 5 cm © Jenny Saville, 

Photo by Mike Bruce

Even though, so far, each series of her paintings has referred to a different period of her life – which she has painterly depicted through her own physical appearance; but, she has never had to start all over again. Human flesh has always remained in the centre of her work. Interestingly, all her paintings are based on photographs since she dislikes working from life.

Her latest exhibition, which is her first solo-exhibition in London, provides more insights into her current state of mind and provides some great material for art historians. As remarkably sensational as usual, her latest works appeal not only to psychoanalysts, dermatologists, white or black colonialisers, but obviously also still to Larry Gagosian – who first showed her work in New York in 1999.

Jenny Saville, In the realm of the Mothers III, 2014
, Pastel, charcoal, and oil on canvas, 
94 1/2 x 144 1/8 inches (240 x 366 cm)
© Jenny Saville, 

Photo by Mike Bruce

Jenny Saville, In the realm of the Mothers III, 2014
, Pastel, charcoal, and oil on canvas, 
94 1/2 x 144 1/8 inches (240 x 366 cm)
© Jenny Saville, 

Photo by Mike Bruce

Especially the two works In the realm of the Mothers I (2012-14) and In the realm of the Mothers III (2014) echo the subject matter of the painting Odalisque (2012-14). The black male coloniser is on top of the female white colonised body. As a mother of two small children, Saville figuratively presents the physical act of how to become one, while painterly expressing a woman’s personal feelings towards the playful interaction between the nude female and the nude male body. Hence, Jenny Saville’s latest work still follows the same initial plan: Fleshing and sexing the canvas in reality.

In comparison to her earlier works, the swamping energy steaming from various colours of flesh seems to have clamed down. The flesh of her human bodies has changed its nuance and shape. In 2014, twenty-two years after graduating from Glasgow School of Art, Jenny Saville’s work is even more serious than ever, as she has moved into the realm of a post-painterly security.

Lisa Moravec is a graduate diploma student at the Courtauld.

Jenny Saville is at the Gagosian Gallery until the 26th July 2014.

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