A Kiss for Valentine’s Day

KISS (1961), Bridget Riley

Just in time for this year’s Valentine’s Day, The Courtauld Gallery will be displaying Bridget Riley’s famous KISS (1961), on loan from a private collection. Auspiciously coming to Room 14 on 14 February, the aptly Valentine’s themed named work will be available for the public to view at their leisure.

Bridget Riley is considered one of the leading abstract artists of her age, finding success from the 1960s onward, and creating works which have always been varied and ground-breaking. Often finding inspiration from daydreams and from setting her own criteria of what she wants from art, her works inspire and encourage artistic engagement.

After a series of emotional events in her romantic life, she began to paint in black and white, helping her to communicate messages as to exactly how she felt. This technique of using black and white brought her artistic success and recognition. One of these works was KISS and can be seen as her first definitive painting in black and white. Riley has detailed how her preceding black painting had failed, and thinking about why it had not worked led her to the realisation that there was no opposition with this completely black painting. By adding a flash of white, in such a way that suggests closeness and makes the black components look like they are almost touching, the title of KISS was born.

Don’t miss seeing this spectacular work at The Courtauld Gallery while it’s here, a perfect Valentine’s treat for those looking for a kiss.

Book tickets

Crazy in Love

According to the shop displays and florists since New Year’s Day, the celebration of love and chocolate is around the corner. To celebrate Valentine’s Day here at the Gallery, we took a look at our collection’s best depictions of love.

 

The Nerli Chest, Biagio d’Antonio, 1472

Chest and spalliera with the arms of Vaggia Nerli and Lorenzo Morelli (The Nerli Chest)

One of a pair of chests made to celebrate the marriage of Vaggia Nerli and Lorenzo Morelli, the Nerli chest was intended for the bride.

Though made in celebration of matrimony, the chest itself seems more a celebration of maternal love than marital affection. It shows the story of the punishment of schoolmaster in ancient Falerii who wanted to offer his pupils to the Romans, betraying them. The Roman officer Camillus saved the children from this fate and gave them rods with which to beat the schoolmaster, a reminder for Vaggia Nerli to protect her children.

Perhaps the moral is that to love your children is to teach them how to protect themselves… with a big stick.

 

Peter Paul Rubens, Family of Jan Brueghel the Elder, 1613-15

Peter Paul Rubens, Family of Jan Brueghel the Elder, 1613-15

This one is so sweet it hurts, rendering me unable to make a joke. Rubens and Jan Brueghel were close friends and Rubens created a tender portrait of his friend and his family. 

Catharina Brueghel sweetly draws her two children closer, gently touching her son Pieter’s shoulder as he plays with her bracelet. She clasps hands with her young daughter Elisabeth as the little girl stares adoringly up at her mother.

 

Thomas Gainsborough, Portrait of Mrs. Gainsborough, Circa 1778

Thomas Gainsborough, Portrait of Mrs. Gainsborough, Circa 1778

Family legend holds that Mr. Gainsborough painted a portrait of his Mrs. every year on their wedding anniversary.

Sadly we only know of 5 portraits of Mrs. Gainsborough by her husband, but this portrait is a beautiful testament to their (sometimes fraught) relationship. When painting family, someone the artist knows well, the experience is vastly different from a commissioned portrait or working with a professional model.

This painting is more informal, the technique looser than in other Gainsborough portraits.

 

Georges Seurat, Young Woman Powdering Herself, ca 1888-90

To finish, a secret love. The woman in the was Seurat’s mistress Madeleine Knobloch. It was only after Seurat’s death that his family learned of her relationship with Seurat and the two children she bore him.

As can be seen in this infra-red photograph, which shows the paint layers underneath the surface, Seurat originally represented himself in the small mirror, painting Madeleine as she applied her makeup.

A friend, unaware of the romantic relationship between painter and model, made fun of Seurat’s inclusion of himself and Seurat angrily painted himself out, replacing his face with flowers in a vase on the corner of a table.

In 1890, Madeleine lost both Seurat and their eldest son to an infectious disease, probably diphtheria.