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A Kiss for Valentine’s Day

KISS (1961), Bridget Riley

Just in time for this year’s Valentine’s Day, The Courtauld Gallery will be displaying Bridget Riley’s famous KISS (1961), on loan from a private collection. Auspiciously coming to Room 14 on 14 February, the aptly Valentine’s themed named work will be available for the public to view at their leisure.

Bridget Riley is considered one of the leading abstract artists of her age, finding success from the 1960s onward, and creating works which have always been varied and ground-breaking. Often finding inspiration from daydreams and from setting her own criteria of what she wants from art, her works inspire and encourage artistic engagement.

After a series of emotional events in her romantic life, she began to paint in black and white, helping her to communicate messages as to exactly how she felt. This technique of using black and white brought her artistic success and recognition. One of these works was KISS and can be seen as her first definitive painting in black and white. Riley has detailed how her preceding black painting had failed, and thinking about why it had not worked led her to the realisation that there was no opposition with this completely black painting. By adding a flash of white, in such a way that suggests closeness and makes the black components look like they are almost touching, the title of KISS was born.

Don’t miss seeing this spectacular work at The Courtauld Gallery while it’s here, a perfect Valentine’s treat for those looking for a kiss.

Book tickets

The Courtauld Gallery Redevelopment – We want to hear your views!

The Courtauld Gallery, part of The Courtauld Institute of Art, is currently in the process of developing proposals as part of a £52 million Masterplan which will see the transformation of the building and its public offer.

Improving the in-Gallery experience and our public programming are key aspects of the redevelopment and we are keen to reflect the opinions of both existing visitors and potential new audiences as we develop our exciting proposals. We would be delighted if you could attend one of a series of informal focus groups being held by Jura Consultants at The Courtauld Gallery. All participants will receive £30 and refreshments will be provided.

Focus groups dates and times are as follows:

Previous visitors to The Courtauld Gallery (those who have visited in the past 3 years)

Date Time
 

Wednesday 22 February 2017

 

 

6.00pm – 7.30pm

 

Thursday 23 February 2017 3.30pm – 5.00pm

 

Those who have never visited/ not visited for over 3 years

Date Time
 

Thursday 23 February 2017

 

 

6.00pm -7.30pm

 

Friday 24 February  2017 10.30am – 12.00pm

 

If you are interested in attending please follow the web link next to your preferred focus group session. We have a limited number of places per group which will be allocated on a first come first served basis.

The focus groups will take place at Somerset House. Please report to The Courtauld Institute of Art Reception at The Strand Entrance of Somerset House (opposite The Courtauld Gallery entrance). A member of our team will accompany you to the focus group venue.

If you have any queries or would like any further information please contact Rae Morton at Jura Consultants on 0131 440 6750 or at rae@jura-consultants.co.uk.

We look forward to hearing your views!

A contortionist in the studio

Our Rodin and Dance: The Essence of Movement exhibition is now open. We invited Viola Bruni, Acrobat, Dancer, Movement Director and Teacher to write a blog from her perspective about the works on display.

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Fig 1: Movement A

Contortion is not an art that everybody can practice, but Alda Moreno was definitely gifted with the extraordinary flexibility necessary to practice
 this ancient technique. In the fascinating exhibition “Rodin and Dance: 
the Essence of Movement”, the French model and acrobat is captured on paper and in clay in a series of movements which demonstrate her ability to bend 
in extreme ways. When I look at these sculptures I can see that not all of them are realistic. To my eye, Rodin was playing with exaggerating movements by composing impossible poses. Nevertheless, some of the movements are also realistic, and look similar to movements of the circus discipline of contortion, of Yoga and of gymnastics.

Myriam Peignist in her article “Histoire anthropologique des danses acrobatiques” , suggests that Alda Moreno worked at the Opéra Comique in an environment where dance and circus melt to create the professional figure of  the danseuse-acrobat, a sort of hybrid performer in between dance and circus.

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Fig 2: Movement B

 By taking part in a collaborative project led by the MA/MFA Movement: Directing and Teaching course leaders at Royal Central School of Speech & Drama, and exhibition curator Dr. Gerstein, it was interesting to note that many of the movements seem to be preparatory ones rather than finished poses. Having a circus background, it was clear to me when certain poses could lead to further acrobatic movements.  Differing art historians suggest that when embarking on a series 
of drawings Rodin used to watch carefully chosen models moving for hours. When he saw something interesting, he was quickly capturing it on paper. Most of the time he did this without interrupting the flow of the models’ movements by asking them to stand still in a pose. Being an acrobat and model for artists myself, I experienced being captured both in stillness and motion. If I imagine being one of Rodin’s models, with others moving around me for an indefinite amount of time, I know that I would reach a state of flow, being liberated from time constraints and the pressure to create a pose. Such a state enables one to find one’s own personal rhythms and ways of exploring movement. Maybe this also happened to Rodin’s models, allowing him to capture normally unseen movements, warm-ups, and transitions. In my experience as performer, these moments retain more intimacy and subtleties than a perfectly finished pose.

If we look closely at Movement A (fig. 1) we can see both hands catching the lifted feet. This pose could be finished in itself, or it could be caught at the middle stage of a ‘back catch’ or ‘leg in hand’ pose. If that is the case, the hands grasping the feet have the function of helping lift the leg until it reaches the maximum extension.

Acrobats Blog

Fig 3: Split with back catch

What makes Movement A interesting for me, is its versatility. Both the movement as Rodin portrayed it, and the final pose it could lead to can be performed in a variety of ways. This means that Rodin might have seen Alda Moreno performing Movement A in a number of different orientations: standing, lying on one side, lying on the chest, in a split (fig. 3).

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Fig. 4 Y scale pose

Movement A can also originate from Movement B (fig. 2): one arm catches the opposite lifted leg, creating a hole for the other arm to pass through it. If the flexibility permits, as in the case of a contortionist, the lifted leg can be rotated to reach a back catch pose, with the shoulder involved in the rotation and the knee of the floor leg bending then extending again to allow the movement.

Movement B could also simply lead to the pose in fig. 4 which is also part of the rhythmic gymnastic vocabulary. In this case, in order to reach the finite position, the shoulder of the free arm passes through the hole. It is then positioned close to the knee, so to lock the torso in a stable pose. The arm is then stretched on the side, and can potentially hold an object. For example a ribbon in rhythmic gymnastic, or be positioned according to various expressive functions.

Visit Rodin and Dance: The Essence of Movement, until 22 January 2016

Photo credits
Artist: Claudia Hughes
Photographer: Despina Photography

 

Kenneth Clark Travel Award Winner

On Tuesday we were thrilled to welcome Rosie Shackleton to The Courtauld Institute of Art’s galleries. Rosie, a sixth form student from Dixons Academy in Leeds, chose to visit The Courtauld after she was awarded the Kenneth Clark Travel Award during her participation in the ARTiculation Prize, a competition encouraging young people to speak publicly about art. Courtauld undergraduate student Annabelle Birchenough tells us about Rosie’s visit:

693a3064As a current Courtauld Student Ambassador who took part in ARTiculation in 2013, I was delighted to accompany Rosie during her visit. The day comprised of a number of fascinating behind the scenes insights into the workings of The Institute, including a visit to the Gilbert and Ildiko Butler Drawings Gallery, and Prints and Drawings Study Room.

First, we were fortunate to have Assistant Curator of Works on Paper, Dr Rachel Sloan talk us through the curation processes involved in her current drawings gallery display Regarding Trees, before taking us to the treasure trove that is The Courtauld Prints and Drawings Study Room. On learning that Rosie has a particular interest in Impressionism, Rachel pulled out a wonderful box of early Impressionist drawings and prints that Rosie really enjoyed getting up close to. The Programming Manager, Learning, Stephanie Christodoulou then talked Rosie through the general workings of the main gallery before we finished the day with a detailed walk around The Courtauld Gallery’s permanent collection, as well as the temporary display of Georgina Houghton’s work. By the end of the visit, Rosie told me she couldn’t have asked for more and summed the success of the day up as follows:

“I really enjoyed the visit. There were great insights into how a gallery is run, particularly on the paper and prints side of the institute, and I really loved the Van Gogh drawing we saw! The Impressionist gallery was just luscious and brilliant. I really loved the Georgia Houghton too – it was really interesting.”

Congratulations again Rosie, we hope to see you soon!

 

Win a signed copy of ‘30-Second Fashion’ book by Rebecca Arnold

We have five copies of ‘30-Second Fashion: The 50 key modes, garments and designers, each explained in half a minute’ signed by Editor Rebecca Arnold to give away, with two complimentary tickets to the Gallery.  Dr Rebecca Arnold is Oak Foundation Lecturer in History of Dress and Textiles at The Courtauld Institute of Art.history-of-dress

 

This beautiful book, published by Ivy Press, gives an accessible and lively introduction to modern fashion – from haute couture to high street, from catwalk to street style, from glossy magazine to online blog.

To win, tell us –

Which abstract artist inspired Yves Saint Laurent’s iconic shift dress?

Email your answer, full name and postal address to marketing@courtauld.ac.uk to enter!

Winners will be drawn at random from correct entries. Closing date is Friday 20 September 2016, 5pm.